How you can make a difference

Courtesy UBC

Courtesy UBC

Learn about the issues

Sign up for the Project Seahorse newsletter, follow us on social media, and check out our 'Marine Conservation 101' reading list.

Sarah Foster/Project Seahorse

Sarah Foster/Project Seahorse

Make wise consumer choices

Looking for advice on sustainable seafood and other ocean-friendly products? We can help you with that. 

Iain Caldwell/Project Seahorse

Iain Caldwell/Project Seahorse

Become a citizen scientist

Join iSeahorse, our new citizen science program, and support seahorse conservation and science around the world.  

Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.

— Rachel Carson
Bruno van Saen/Guylian SOTW

Bruno van Saen/Guylian SOTW

Donate to Project Seahorse

We depend on the generosity of our partners and dedicated individuals to carry out our vital conservation work. 

Nick Hill/Project Seahorse

Nick Hill/Project Seahorse

Work with Project Seahorse

View our latest openings for volunteers, students, and staff and find out how you can apply.

 

 
 

Learn about the issues

 
Photo: UBC

Photo: UBC

Follow us on social media

If you haven't already, check us out on social media. Follow us on Twitter to join in the conversation about marine conservation and the issues affecting our oceans today. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram for beautiful photos and interesting facts. 

Sign up for the Project Seahorse newsletter

Our quarterly newsletter digests all the most important Project Seahorse and related news on seahorses, marine conservation and our work. Subscribe here.

Read on

Stay tuned for our reading list of great books, blogs, and other resources on marine conservation. If you want to go deeper, explore our publications database of biological and conservation research.

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Become a citizen scientist

 
 
Join iSeahorse today! Photo: Iain Caldwell/Project Seahorse

Join iSeahorse today! Photo: Iain Caldwell/Project Seahorse

Join iSeahorse

iSeahorse is a website and smartphone app that allows anyone, anywhere in the world to contribute to seahorse science and conservation by sharing their wild seahorse sightings, helping to identify seahorse species, and advocating for new protections.

No prior knowledge is necessary! Simply by adding your observations and helping to identify seahorses on iSeahorse.org, you are contributing to seahorse knowledge and conservation.

If you have a smartphone, be sure to download our app before you head into the field.

Recruit other citizen scientists

Are your friends or family going on a seaside holiday? Do you belong to a dive club? Know some seahorse enthusiasts? Please spread the word about iSeahorse. You can download our iSeahorse poster and sticker or share our posts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Organize a long-term trends monitoring project

Are you interested in taking your citizen science to the next level by tracking a seahorse population over time? Learn more about how you can get involved in this essential conservation program.

Become a seahorse advocate in your community or region

Are seahorse populations in your area being threatened by habitat loss, overfishing, or other activities? Contact your local politician or send a note to your local newspaper or broadcaster. In the coming months we will be adding an advocacy toolkit and other features to iSeahorse.org, so please stay tuned. In the meantime, consider organizing a local petition to protect the seahorses in your ocean neighbourhood.

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Donate to Project Seahorse

 
 
Photo: Bruno van Saen/Guylian Seahorses of the World

Photo: Bruno van Saen/Guylian Seahorses of the World

Project Seahorse depends on the support of our partners and dedicated individuals to continue our vital conservation work.  

Click here to make a one time or regular donation to Project Seahorse through our partner, the University of British Columbia.  

If you prefer to donate by cheque, please follow the instructions here.

Any donation, no matter how large or small, makes a difference!

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Make wise consumer choices

 
 
Bottom trawling is one of the most destructive fishing practices there is. Photo: Sarah Foster/Project Seahorse

Bottom trawling is one of the most destructive fishing practices there is. Photo: Sarah Foster/Project Seahorse

Avoid eating shrimp

Simply put, shrimp trawling and shrimp farming are among the most destructive activities in our oceans. Find out how they harm seahorse populations and how you can make sustainable seafood choices.

Avoid products containing microplastics

Ten percent of all plastic we throw away ends up in the ocean, where it breaks down into tiny particles and is absorbed into the food web, causing all kinds of problems. And it's not just plastic bottles! Facial creams and other beauty products, for example, contain microbead plastics that, when the creams are washed down the drain, can end up in the ocean.

We need to work together to prevent plastics from getting into the ocean in the first place. You can make a difference — for starters, use plastic products sparingly, and recycle, recycle, recycle.

Here's a useful smartphone app that will help you choose products that don't won't pollute our oceans.

Eat sustainable seafood

MSC EcolabelSeafood Watch, and SeaChoice all have smartphone apps and other guides to help you choose seafood that is good for you and our oceans.

Join a community-supported fishery

This is another great way to source sustainable seafood and help your local economy. It’s like a farmshare, but for seafood. Skipper Otto's in Vancouver, Canada is a good example, but a growing number of CSFs are popping up all over. Check out LocalCatch.org's CSF directory for the one nearest you.

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Work with Project Seahorse

 
 
Photo: Nick Hill/Project Seahorse

Photo: Nick Hill/Project Seahorse

Academic opportunities

Please check back soon.

Employment opportunities

Please check back soon. 

Volunteer opportunities

We're always interested to hear from enthusiastic, conservation-minded people. If you live in the Vancouver, B.C. area and want to help out at our UBC offices, drop us a line. If you're based in a part of the world where there are seahorses, consider joining our iSeahorse citizen science and conservation project.

IUCN Seahorse, Pipefish and Stickleback Specialist Group

The IUCN Seahorse, Pipefish, and Stickleback Specialist Group is currently made up of 15 members from 9 countries worldwide. We plan to broaden our scope to include more experts from other regions in the coming year. If you have suggestions or would like to find out how you can get involved, please get in touch.

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